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For businesses

For individuals

Currently the furlough scheme ends on 30 September 2021.

For any period of furlough ending on or before 30 June 2021, employers can claim 80% of an employee’s usual salary for hours not worked up to a maximum of £2,500 per month.

On 1 July 2021 this changes to 70%, capped at £2,187.50 per month and the employer must pay the additional 10% to the employee.

Then from 1 August 2021 employers can claim 60% as furlough to a maximum of £1,875 per month and must pay the additional 20% to employees. Employers will still be required to pay NI and pension contributions. 

There is no requirement to do this but employers can chose to do so. 

For periods ending on or before 30 April 2021, employers can claim for employees who were employed on 30 October 2020, as long as they made a PAYE RTI submission to HMRC between 20 March 2020 and 2 March 2021.

Employees should only be placed on furlough in situations where the employer's business has been affected by Covid-19 restrictions or had a lower uptake as a result. 

Yes, furlough agreements should be in place and signed by the employee. 
From 1 December 2020 employers have been prevented from claiming furlough for employees who are in their notice period.
Yes, employers can place clinically extremely vulnerable employees and those with caring responsibilities for vulnerable adults, or children whilst schools are closed on furlough, even if the business hasn’t faced difficulties or had to close down due to the pandemic. 
No, a woman can’t be on maternity leave and furlough. If a woman is on maternity leave she can give 8 weeks’ notice to end her maternity leave and return to work, and once she has returned to work she can then be placed on furlough. 
Yes, employees can still be put on flexible furlough. Employers will need to have a signed agreement which covers the hours the employee will be working and the hours they will be on furlough. 
No, any hours and working pattern can be agreed and this can be changed as and when necessary. 
Employers can claim for 80-60% of pay for hours not worked, depending on the date claimed, for usual working hours not worked by the employee, up to the £2,500 cap.
Yes, an employee who is on furlough can be made redundant, providing the employer can establish a genuine redundancy situation and follows a fair redundancy process. 

The intention of furlough is that employees return to work afterwards. Therefore, if it is likely the role will still be viable at the end of the furlough scheme then to put an employee on furlough instead of making them redundant should be considered as an alternative to redundancy.

However, there’s no requirement to furlough an employee in a situation where it’s just prolonging the inevitable and they will always be made redundant as the role is no longer viable. In these cases an employer can make the employee redundant instead of putting them on or continuing to furlough them.

Employers should be aware that at a future date, they may be required to justify why an employee was made redundant rather than furloughed. Employers should take legal advice before starting a redundancy process.

If a customer refuses to wear a face covering you can ask if they are exempt, however, you cannot require evidence of this so be cautious if insisting on evidence as this could be viewed as discriminatory. If someone tells you they are exempt from wearing a face covering you should consider reasonable adjustments. If someone is refusing to wear a face covering without reason, you can consider refusing service as long as this is fair and you are sure there is not discrimination.
After the 19 July a business will still be free to set its own safety measures in relation to covid-19 and may choose to maintain the requirement for staff and customers to wear a face mask. If an employee refuses without good reason this may still be refusal of a reasonable request of an employer but the request may be viewed as 'less' reasonable where the wearing of face masks is no longer a legal requirement.
There is no specific legislation which allows an employer to require an employee to undergo medical treatment of any kind, including vaccination. However an employer may be able to establish that the refusal to get a vaccination at the request of the employer is refusal of a reasonable request and consider disciplinary action as a result. However, this stance from employers is likely to only be reasonable in limited circumstances, such as where employers role involves a lot of interaction with vulnerable persons, such as in a health care environment. A requirement to be vaccinated could be discriminatory for religious or medical grounds.
Yes, this could be a reasonable request of an employer and disciplinary action may result if the request is refused. However, as with vaccinations, the employer must show the reasonableness of the request to take a lateral flow test. If employers have made lateral flow testing mandatory they must provide the test to the employee and if an employee is taking the test outside of normal working hours an employer must ensure that employees who receive National Minimum Wage (NMW) are paid for this as if not they could argue that they have not been paid NMW for working time.

There have been four changes to SSP:

  1. SSP is now payable from day one of sickness 
  2. The first 14 days of SSP are reclaimable from the government 
  3. Employees who are not sick but who are isolating in line with public health England/Wales advice are entitled to SSP
  4. Employees can provide an isolation note, available from NHS 111 as opposed to a fit note from the doctor.

SSP has been extended to those employees who have been told to self-isolate under the new track and trace system. This is where a person has been notified that they have been in contact with a person with COVID-19 and therefore must self-isolate for 14 days, they will be entitled to be paid SSP.

Employees who are vulnerable but do not have symptoms, and no one who they live with has symptoms, are only advised to isolate. Because they aren’t required to isolate, like those with symptoms or living with someone with symptoms, they are not classed as sick and therefore not entitled to SSP. They can be required to come to work, but a better option would be to furlough this person.

If you're put at risk of redundancy, your employer has to follow a fair redundancy process and consult with you.

This is dependent on the size of your employer and how many employees are at risk of redundancy so you should take specific advice if you’re in this situation. The amount you are paid for redundancy is dependent upon your age, length or service and weekly salary.

If you’ve been advised to self-isolate because you or someone in your household has symptoms, you are entitled to Statutory Sick Pay (SSP). 

You may be entitled to company sick pay depending on your contract of employment. You are also entitled to SSP if you've been told to self isolate under the track and trace scheme. 

Being advised to self-isolate because you're vulnerable is not the same as self-isolating because you have symptoms or because someone in your household does, and you are therefore not entitled to Statutory Sick Pay (SSP).

You should speak to your employer about the option to work from home; if this isn’t possible you can ask your employer to furlough you. If you do not attend work, this must be in agreement with your employer. 

Yes, this could be a reasonable request of an employer and disciplinary action may result if the request is refused. However, as with vaccinations, the employer must show the reasonableness of the request to take a lateral flow test. If employers have made lateral flow testing mandatory they must provide the test to the employee and if an employee is taking the test outside of normal working hours an employer must ensure that employees who receive National Minimum Wage (NMW) are paid for this as if not they could argue that they have not been paid NMW for working time.
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